LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

Photo courtesy of Energy.gov

Photo courtesy of Energy.gov

 

HISTORY

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is located in Los Alamos County in north central New Mexico (NM). LANL, founded in 1943 during World War II as Project Y, served as a secret facility for research and development of the first nuclear weapon. The site was chosen because the area provided controlled access, steep canyons for testing high explosives, and existing infrastructure. The Manhattan Project's research and development efforts that were previously spread throughout the nation became centralized at LANL.

CURRENT MISSIONS

  • Energy Security: LANL has three main areas of focus in energy security, including safe and sustainable nuclear energy, materials and concepts for clean energy, and mitigating impacts of global energy demand growth.

  • Nuclear Deterrence and Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos is the design agency for four systems in the stockpile, including the B61 gravity bomb, W78, W76, and W88.

  • Protecting Against Nuclear Threats: Provides early identification, creative maturation, and timely delivery of scientifically robust solutions to the most urgent and technically challenging security issues facing the nation.

  • Emerging Threats and Opportunities: LANL works with the Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, and Intelligence Community to provide technical solutions for prediction and/or prevention of catastrophic threats, counter new foreign strategic and tactical technological advances, and improve national security.

CLEANUP ISSUES

The LANL Cleanup Project is responsible for the treatment, storage and disposition of a variety of radioactive and hazardous waste streams, removal and disposition of buried waste, protection of the regional aquifer, and removal or deactivation on unneeded facilities.

HOST LOCAL COMMUNITIES

COMMUNITY priorities

To support LANL, Los Alamos County adopted the following strategic goals as part of its overall Economic Vitality Strategic Plan:

  • Collaborate with LANL as the area’s #1 employer.

  • Support spinoff business opportunities from LANL.

  • Strengthen coordination and cooperation between County government, LANL, and regional and national partners.

  • Actively pursue land transfer opportunities.

 Los Alamos County has also adopted the following federal legislative priority issues:

  • NNSA must take into account the potential negative impacts to the State of New Mexico and County when awarding the LANL Management contract.

  • Fully fund National Security and Science at LANL including plutonium pit mission.

  • Fund $220 Million for environmental cleanup funding at LANL.

  • Manhattan Project National Historical Park Fund – Add the Tunnel Vault site eligibility and fund implementation.

FY 2020 BUDGET


FY 2018 Enacted FY 2019 Enacted FY 2020 Request
220,000 220,000 195,462

(Defense Environmental Cleanup. Amounts in thousands of dollars. Click here for the latest site budget.)

PRIMARY OPERATING CONTRACTORS

REGIONAL COALITION OF LANL COMMUNITIES

  • Mission: The Regional Coalition is comprised of elected and tribal officials representing their local communities to ensure national decisions incorporate local needs and interests.

  • Contact: Regional Coalition Office – Phone: (505) 336-4247; Email: RegionalCoalitionNM@gmail.com

  • Website: https://regionalcoalition.org/

COMMUNITY REUSE ORGANIZATION

Regional Development Corporation

  • Mission: The RDC’s mission is to diversify the economy within the north central New Mexico region.

  • Contact: Val Alonzo, Executive Director – Phone: (505) 231-3550; Email: val@rdcnm.org

  • Website: http://rdcnm.org/

ELECTED LEADERSHIP

Federal Government

State Government

Local Government

MEDIA CONTACT INFORMATION

  • General News Media Questions at LANL

    • Kevin Roark: (505) 665-9202

    • Matt Nerzig: (505) 665-9178

  • Los Alamos County Communications & Public Relations

BY THE NUMBERS

  • 93% of the legacy TRU waste stored above ground has been removed.

  • More than 50% of legacy cleanup has been completed.

  • 2,100 contaminated sites were originally identified for action, ranging from small spills to large landfills.

SITE NEWS

Updated August 2019.
Information in this profile is sourced from DOE, NNSA, and the site’s online resources.