LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY

Photo courtesy of Energy.gov

Photo courtesy of Energy.gov

 

HISTORY

The Lawrence Laboratory National Laboratory (LLNL) was established in 1952 at the height of the Cold War. Its mission was to meet urgent national security needs by advancing nuclear weapons science and technology. Renowned physicists E.O. Lawrence and Edward Teller argued for the creation of a second laboratory to augment the efforts of the laboratory at Los Alamos. Environmental programs begun in the 1960s have led to novel groundwater remediation technologies in use at Superfund sites, models that are contributing to understanding the human impact on global climate change, and the establishment of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (NARAC) at Livermore.

The energy crisis in the 1970s invigorated energy research programs at LLNL, which are part of the government-industry partnership to develop long-term reliable, affordable, clean sources of energy. After the United States halted nuclear testing in 1992, LLNL helped the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) define the Stockpile Stewardship Program, which ensures the safety, security, and reliability of the nation’s nuclear deterrent without nuclear testing. LLNL continued to advance and apply science and technology to ensure national security within the global context. LLNL successfully completed a life-extension program for the nation’s most modern Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) warhead, the W87, that will enable it to remain in the U.S. strategic arsenal well into the 21st century. LLNL also initiated major efforts in energy security. This work is aimed at the development of sustainable energy resources and technologies while reducing their environmental impacts and increasing our understanding of climate change.

CURRENT MISSIONS

CLEANUP ISSUES

Soil and groundwater contamination was discovered at LLNL’S Livermore Site and Site 300 in the 1980s. This contamination resulted from early research activities. In the case of the Livermore site, a good portion of the soil and groundwater contamination also has been attributed to solvents and degreasers that were used to clean airplane engines while the site served as a U.S. Naval Air Station in the early 1940s.

The two sites were subsequently placed on the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) list, more commonly known as the Superfund list, which provides a mechanism for cleaning up pollutants and contaminants in the environment. LLNL has partnered with DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the California Department of Toxic Substances Control and the Regional Water Quality Control Boards to clean up this legacy waste material.

HOST LOCAL COMMUNITIES

FY 2020 BUDGET


FY 2018 Enacted FY 2019 Enacted FY 2020 Request
1,175 1,704 1,727

(Defense Environmental Cleanup. Amounts in thousands of dollars. Click here for the latest site budget.)

PRIMARY OPERATING CONTRACTORS

ELECTED LEADERSHIP

Federal Government

 State Government

Local Government

MEDIA CONTACT INFORMATION

  • Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    • Lynda Seaver, Director, Public Affairs

  • Livermore Mayor’s Office

    • Phone: (925) 960-4020

SITE NEWS

Updated August 2019.
Information in this profile is sourced from DOE, NNSA, and the site’s online resources.